The Cemetery contains 3 soldiers of the Cheshire Regiment, who were taken prisoner during the Battalion's action at Audregnies on 24th August 1914.



1st Battalion, The Cheshire Regiment
Officers, N.C.O.s and Men of the 1st Battalion, Buried in Berlin South Western Cemetery

©: G E Conway, 2009
Their name liveth for evermore
Private E J Conway (circa. 1905)
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Private 7144 Thomas VAUGHAN

Date of Death:
10 November 1914           
(Died of wounds in Doberitz p.o.w. camp)
Grave No:
VIII.G.4.
Unit:
'C' Company
Age:
29


Personal History:
Thomas (John) was born in Tredegar, Monmouthshire, Wales, in the December quarter 1894, the eldest son of William (Coal miner) and Elizabeth Ann Vaughan, of 59 High Street, Tredegar, Monmouthshire.

The 1901 Census shows that he had three younger siblings, Ellen, Rees and Lewis. (1901 Census of Wales. RG 13/4937)

The 1911 Census (RG14/31849) lists two more younger brothers, William and Alfred, and although Alfred is only 1 year old, Elizabeth is now listed as a widow. 16 year old Thomas John is working as a 'Coal Hewer', no doubt at Tredegar pit (see photo on left).  The family is now living at 10 Lower Coronation Street, Tredegar. There is no record of him marrying.

Military History:
Thomas enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment at Cardiff. Currently his Army records appear to have been destroyed by Second World War bombing. However, it is likely that he joined the Cheshire Regiment in 1912/13 when aged 18.

His Medal Index Card, however, shows that as a regular soldier he entered France on 16 August 1914. He was reported missing from the Battalion following the action at Audregnies on 24th August. He fought on the right of the line under Captain Dugmore.

Thomas was held at Doberitz prisoner of war camp, Brandenburg, until he died on 10th November 1914. He was initially buried there but in 1922-23 it was decided that the graves of Commonwealth servicemen who had died all over Germany should be brought together into four permanent cemeteries.  Berlin South-Western was one of those chosen and in 1924-25, graves were brought into the cemetery from more than 140 burial grounds in eastern Germany and 38 burials from Doberitz were re-buried at Berlin.

Tredegar Pit, where Thomas worked before his Army Service
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Berlin South Western Cemetery
This cemetery contains 1174 named Commonwealth burials.

In 1922-23 it was decided that the graves of Commonwealth servicemen who had died all over Germany should be brought together into four permanent cemeteries. 

Berlin South-Western was one of those chosen and in 1924-25, graves were brought into the cemetery from more than 140 burial grounds in eastern Germany.



There is no evidence that the two members of the 1st Battalion listed below died of wounds received in action. The records show that they were taken prisoner on 24th August 1914.

The fact that both died late in the War, in 1918, might suggest they died from illness, probably the 'flu pandemic prevalent at that time.
Medal ribbon bar
All of the men named below were awarded the 1914 Star (with "clasps and roses"), the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
Click on image to see full medal set
Pt Vaughan's Medal Index Card
The three men buried here all fought at Audregnies and were taken prisoner on 24 August 1914. They subsequently died whilst prisoners of War.

Use the links on the left to read a little more about each man and see where he is buried.
 
Pt Vaughan's gravestone
Private 7812 Edward CLARKE (A.R.)

Date of Death:
22 November 1918
Grave No:
II.F.6.
Unit:
'D' Company
Age:
32
Personal History:
The SDGW database states that Edward was born in Garston, Liverpool in 1886, probably the son of Thomas and Ellen. The 1911 Census shows him living in the Regimental Barracks of 2nd Battalion Cheshire Regiment, The Ridge, Jubbulpore, India, and that he was unmarried. (RG 14/43980)
Military History:
Edward enlisted in the 2nd Battalion the Cheshire Regiment at Cardiff. Currently his Army records are unavailable, undoubtedly destroyed by Second World War bombing. However, his Service Number suggests he enlisted in December 1904, probably aged 18, on a 7+5 term of service (i.e. 7 years active service plus 5 years reserve). He served in India at Jubbulpore, probably until 1911/12, before being transferred to the Reserve List.

His Medal Index Card, however, shows that as a Reservist he was recalled to the Battalion at the outbreak of War and entered France on 16 August 1914. He was reported missing from the Battalion following the action at Audregnies on 24th August. His 'D' Company fought on the right of the line under Captains Rae-Jones and Rich.

It is not known where Edward was held in Germany but others in the Battalion were at Doberitz prisoner of war camp, Brandenburg. He died after the Armistice was signed, on 22nd November 1918 and may have originally been buried at Doberitz.  In 1924-25 graves were brought into Berlin South Western Cemetery from more than 140 burial grounds in eastern Germany and 38 burials from Doberitz were re-buried there.
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Pt Clarke's gravestone
Pt Clarke's Medal Index Card
Private 9578 James GANNER

Date of Death:
18 November 1918
Grave No:
XI.B..6.A
Unit:
'C' Company
Age:
25
Personal History:
James was born in the first quarter of 1893 at Crewe, Cheshire the son of Samuel and Elizabeth Ganner, of 34 Grosvenor St., Crewe. He had four brothers, George, Samuel, Edward and William. The 1911 Census shows an 18 year Private James residing in Military accommodation in Chester Castle and Barracks. (RG 14/21870)

His older brother, Sgt. 8782 George Ganner, served throughout the War as a regular soldier (7 + 5 years) with the 1st Battalion ('C' Coy.).
Military History:
James enlisted in the 1st Battalion the Cheshire Regiment at Chester. Currently his Army records are unavailable, probably destroyed in Second World War bombing.  However, his Service Number suggests he enlisted in 1911, aged 18, on a 3+9 term of service (i.e. 3 years active service plus 9 years reserve).

His Medal Index Card, however, shows that as a regular soldier he entered France on 16 August 1914. He was reported missing from the Battalion following the action at Audregnies on 24th August where his Company fought under Captain Dugmore on the right of the line.

He died as a p.o.w. on 18th November 1918, just one week after the Armistice was signed and may have originally been buried where he died.  In 1924-25 graves were brought into Berlin S.W. Cemetery from more than 140 burial grounds in eastern Germany and James might have been re-buried there.

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Pt Ganner's gravestone
Pt Ganner's Medal Index Card
Tredegar pit (fr. postcard)