This cemetery contains 12 Commonwealth burials (all from the UK) including 2 "Known Unto God". Seven of the burials are from the Norfolk and Cheshire stand in the adjacent fields in August 1914, whilst the remaining 3, obscurely contain Naval burials from the last days of the War in November 1918.

The Cemetery contains 3 named soldiers of the Cheshire Regiment who died defending the village of Elouges and Audregnies during the BEF's 'Retreat from Mons' on 24 August 1914. Buried close together are two decorated Officers, Captain Ernest-Rae Jones and Lieutenant Kingdon Tregosse Frost - both of whom have pages dedicated to them in this site.



1st Battalion, The Cheshire Regiment
Officers, N.C.O.s and Men of the 1st Battalion, Buried in Wiheries Communal Cemetery

©: G E Conway, 2009
Their name liveth for evermore
Private E J Conway (circa. 1905)
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"Grandad's War"
All of the men named below were awarded the 1914 Star (with "clasps and roses"), the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
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Captain Ernest Rae JONES

Date of Death:
24 August 1914
(Killed in Action)
Grave No:
III. A. 4.
Unit:
Officer Commanding
'D' Company
Age:
36




Personal History:
Captain Ernest Rae Jones was born at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, the son of Mr. and Mrs. S. Jones. On 10th November 1908 he married Geraldine Esme Belinda Prior in Lichfield Cathedral. She was born in the Barton Regis District of Gloucestershire, December quarter 1883, so was about 5 years younger than him. She was the daughter of Major-General John Edward Hale Prior of the Staffordshire Regiment, who died suddenly in January 1900 shortly before taking up command of the 15th Division in South Africa. In 1901, aged 17, she was a boarder at Eastbury House School, Watford, Herts. (In the September quarter 1920 Geraldine re-married, Robert Hall, in Lichfield.)
Military History:
Currently Captain Jones' Army records are unavailable, and do not appear to have survived the Second World War bombing. The London Gazette (22 November 1898) detailed his joining the Regiment: ".. from the Local Military Forces, Canada, to be Second Lieutenant, in succession to Lieutenant W. Auchincloss, resigned. Dated 23rd November, 1898."  It is likely, therefore, that he served in the South African War. On 9th August 1907 he was made vice-Adjutant of the Regiment.

His Medal Index Card shows that at the outbreak of War and entered France 16 August 1914 having sailed from Belfast with the 1st Battalion as CO of 'D' Company. On the night of 23rd August the Battalion moved into position along the Mons-Valenciennes road, with 'D' Company on the right straddling the railway line.

Captain Jones was the Officer Commanding "D" Company, 1st Battalion, in position to the right of "A" Company during the Battle at Audregnies on the 24th August 1914. At about 3.45 pm the Battalions in action began to retire. Captain Jones, on the right flank with the support platoons of 'D' Company had also it seems, got news of the withdrawal from, presumably, stragglers out on his flanks, because he began to retire down the railway line.

The stragglers moved down the railway line towards the Bois d'Audregnies. They passed a small group of trees, then along a track in a field, into a hedge-bordered lane, then to pasture-land south-west of Wiheries. 'Here', writes Crookenden, 'they ran into the Magdeburg Regiment which was going into bivouac. Of those who remained Capt. Jones and Pte. E. Hogan were killed.' 

His gravestone bears the legend: "For his bravery he was given a military funeral by the Germans".

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Drummer 9696 Edward HOGAN

Date of Death:
24 August 1914 (Killed in Action)
Grave No:
III. A. 5.
Unit:
'A' Company
Age:
19


Personal History:
Edward was born in St Laurence's parish, Birkenhead, Cheshire, in the December quarter 1895, the 3rd child of Edward (Iron Driller) and Elizabeth Hogan. He had two older siblings, William and Catherine, and a younger brother, Joseph. In 1901 the family were living in Back St Anne's Street, Birkenhead, Cheshire. (1901 Census 13/3390) In 1911 (Census  RG 14/21401) he was an inmate at Bishop Browns Memorial School Convent, High Street, Stockport, an Industrial School for Catholic Boys. His stated occupation was 'Tailor's Machinist'.
Military History:
Currently his Army records are unavailable, and do not appear to have survived the Second World War bombing; all that is known is that Thomas enlisted at  Stockport, Cheshire.

His Medal Index Card shows that at the outbreak of War and entered France on 16 August 1914. Captain Jones was the Officer Commanding "D" Company, 1st Battalion, in position to the right of Edward's "A" Company during the Battle at Audregnies on the 24th August 1914. At about 3.45 pm the Battalions in action began to retire. Captain Jones, on the right flank with the support platoons of 'D' Company had also it seems, got news of the withdrawal from, presumably, stragglers out on his flanks, because he began to retire down the railway line.

The stragglers moved down the railway line towards the Bois d'Audregnies. They passed a small group of trees, then along a track in a field, into a hedge-bordered lane, then to pasture-land south-west of Wiheries. 'Here', writes Crookenden, 'they ran into the Magdeburg Regiment which was going into bivouac. Of those who remained Capt. Jones and Pte. E. Hogan were killed.'  Edward was buried where he fell and later moved into the village Cemetery.

Photo (left) shows: March 1914 - 1st Battalions Drummers on visit to Chester from Londonderry for visit of King George V. (Dr. Hogan is 4th from right)
Source: 'The 1st Battalion The Cheshire regiment at Mons' - Frank Simpson

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Lieutenant Kingdon Tregosse FROST

Date of Death:
24 August 1914 (Killed in Action)
Grave No:
III. A. 7.
Unit:
3rd battalion (attached) 'C' Company
Age:
25
Personal History:
He was born on the 12th March 1877 at Tamar Terrace, Launceston in the County of Cornwall and was named Kingdon Tregosse Frost, his father was Denis Tregosse Frost a Solicitor by trade and his mother was Sophia Margaret Frost, formerly Messenger.

He was educated at Bath and Brasenose College, Oxford, BA in 1900, MA in 1905 and Lit B. in 1907.  From 1900 to 1901 he was a student of the British school at Athens, 1902 to 1904 a Tutor and Lecturer at Isleworth Training College.  He worked in Egypt from 1904 to 1905 with Prof Sir F Petrie.

The Royal Geographical Society made him a Fellow in 1905. 1905 to 1908 he worked in the Ministry of Education in Egypt and from 1908 to 1909 in the Bodleian Library, Oxford.

Military History:
From 1909 up to his death, he was a Lecturer on Archaeology and Ancient History at Queens University, Belfast.  A member of the Queen's O.T.C (2) unit of which he was a keen and much valued member.  In September 1912 he was gazetted to the 3rd (Special) Reserve Battalion The Cheshire Regiment and was commissioned a Lieutenant in the same unit on the 29 June 1913. When the Great War broke out he served as a reserve officer with the 1st Battalion at the front.

His Medal Index Card shows he entered France with the 1st Battalion on 16 August 1914 and his date of death recorded as 4th September. Research shows that there is no doubt he was killed in action on 24 August (CWGC records show 25th, but there seems little logic for this.)

Crookenden has this to say about Lt. Frost's death: 'This platoon (9 platoon 'C' Company under the command of Sgt. Raynor) received Dugmore's order to retire, but, on reaching the sunken road Raynor (and his corporal) were seized with misgivings, about the authenticity of the order. They did not therefore retire further but lined the bank on the roadside and opened fire on the enemy advancing in front and on their right. The shortage of ammunition, now acute, was causing the NCOs considerable anxiety and a further withdrawal seemed indicated. Just as the platoon was about to move off, some troops were seen to their right rear moving southwards. Lt. Frost, an officer of the Special Reserve who was attached to the platoon, volunteered to go and identify them. He did not return. He was seen later by a wounded officer of the 4 Dragoon Guards "fighting like a demon, having refused to surrender". Although wounded several times, he refused to give in and death alone overcame his indomitable spirit.'



Link to CWGC details
Link to Cemetery name list
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Cheshire burials at Wiheries
... about Lieutenant Kingdon Tregosse Frost
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... about Captain Ernest Rae-Jones
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Capt Jones' gravestone
Capt Jones Meal Index Card
... about Captain Ernest Rae-Jones
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Lt Frost's gravestone
Lt Frost's Meal Index card
... about Lieutenant Kingdon Tregosse Frost
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Dr Hogan's gravestone
1st battalion Drummers 1914
Capt E R Jones