This cemetery contains 2847 Commonwealth burials (2330 from the UK, 220 from Canada, 208 Australians, 79 from New Zealand and 10 South African)  In addition there are 6 "Known Unto God".  There are also 170 German burials.

From October 1914 onwards, Boulogne and Wimereux formed an important hospital centre andwas the headquarters of the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Until June 1918, the medical units at Wimereux used the communal cemetery for burials.

The Cemetery contains 3 named soldiers of the Cheshire Regiment
1st Battalion, The Cheshire Regiment
Officers, N.C.O.s and Men of the 1st Battalion, Buried in Wimereux Communal Cemetery

©: G E Conway, 2009
Their name liveth for evermore
Private E J Conway (circa. 1905)
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"Grandad's War"
All of the men named below were awarded the 1914 Star (with "clasps and roses"), the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
... about how to get to Wimereux Communal Cemetery and other information
Private 10112 John William CONNOLLY

Date of Death:
30 October 1914 (Died of wounds)
Grave No:
I.A.6A
Unit:
'C' Company
Age:
19
Personal History:
John was born in June quarter 1896 the eldest son of John (Labourer) and Maria Connolly of Ash Street, Northwich, Cheshire. In 1911 he had a younger sister Elsie and a younger brother, Bertie. (1911 Census RG 14/21676) Maria Connolly had died in the December quarter 1905. At the time of the issue of John's medals Mr Connolly was living at 1 Peter Court, Yorkshire Buildings, Northwich.

At the time of his enlistment he was employed as a Foundry Labourer. When he joined the Cheshires he was 5' 4" tall (1.63 m.), weighed 136lbs. (9 st. 10lbs.) had a 'fair' complexion, grey eyes and brown hair. His religion was Church of England.
Military History:
According to his Service Record John enlisted at Birkenhead, Cheshire on 8 June 1913, aged 18 years 4 months. His terms of service were for 7 + 5 years (i.e. 7 years Active Service followed by 5 years on Reserve) and after training he was posted to the 1st Battalion at Londonderry on 14th October 1913.

His time with the Regiment in Londonderry was not without some difficulty, however, caused, it seems by not being the cleanest soldier ever to enlist. Five times in December 1913 to January 1914 he was charged: 'dirty rifle on parade'; 'dirty gloves on church parade'; dirty on guard duty'; 'dirty rifle on guard' and 'dirty cooking utensils'. There may have been more but his previous sheet had been lost. For each of these he received between 3 and 5 days 'Confined to Barracks' (C.B.)

Most serious was on 1st September 1914, after the Battalion had arrived in France. He was charged with, "Absent from Roll Call." He was sentenced to 5 days C.B.

As a regular soldier he sailed to France with the 1st Battalion at the outbreak of War and his Medal Card shows he entered France 16th August so was one of those who escaped from the action at Audregnies.

He died at 6.00 a.m. on 30th October 1914 No. 4 General Hospital, Boulogne, during an amputation of his left leg at the thigh caused by a gunshot wound received in action (List 3961). He was probably one of the 78 NCOs and men from the 1st Battalion wounded between 15 - 22 October in action at Voilaines In total he had served 1 year 148 days with the Regiment.
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Private 9619 Frederick JONES      

Date of Death:
30 October 1914 (Died of wounds)
Grave No:
I.A.3A.
Unit:
n/k
Age:
n/k (Poss. 26)
Personal History:
According to the SDGW database Stephen was born in St Werburgh's parish, Chester. The 1901 Census would suggest he was the 4th child of Alice Jones (widow) and born in 1888, in which case he had three older siblings, Elizabeth, Emily and John (1901 Census RG 13/3373), but with such a common name it is impossible to be sure without more information.

Military History:
Frederick enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment at Chester. Currently his Army records are unavailable, probably destroyed in Second World War bombing. 

His service number would suggest that enlisted into the 1st Battalion in June/July 1913 and as a Regular Soldier at the outbreak of War he was stationed in Londonderry. However, his Medal Index Card shows he entered France on 31st August 1914, not the 16th when the rest of the Battalion arrived. The War Diary states that on the 5th September. The Battalion was: "Reinforced by Lt Hartford, 1 Ches Regt and 90 other ranks at 4 p.m." so it could be that Frederick was one of these.

He died on 30th October 1914, probably in the Hospital at Boulogne. He was probably one of the 78 NCOs and men from the 1st Battalion wounded between 15 - 22 October in action at Voilaines.

Link to CWGC details
 
Medal ribbon bar
The three men buried here all  in late October / early November 1914, probably from wounds received in the 1st Battalion's action at Voilaines and Festubert between 15th - 22nd October.

Use the links on the left to read a little more about each man and see where he is buried.
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Private 9743 Stephen CRONAN

Date of Death:
8 November 1914 (Died of wounds)
Grave No:
I.A.25A.
Unit:
n/k
Age:
20


Personal History:
According to the SDGW database Stephen was born in St John's parish, Stockport, Cheshire, in the March quarter 1894. (Birth Index, NA)

There is no record of him or his family on the 1901 Census. Stephen is commemorated on the Stockport War Memorial as "S CRONIN" and the 1911 Census shows a Cronin family, Edmund and Emily, living at 13 Tabley Road, Reddish, Stockport (RG 14/21412). A Stephen Cronin (Piecer in a Cotton Mill) is boarding with the Foley household at 33 Mersey Square, Stockport. However, Edmund and Emily had only been married 5 years, so Emily is unlikely to be Stephen's mother.

There is certainly evidence of confusion in Stephen's surname, as the Medal Index Card contains two spellings - Cronan and Cronen - to add to Cronin!

Military History:
Stephen enlisted in the Cheshire Regiment at Stockport, Cheshire. Currently his Army records are unavailable, probably destroyed in Second World War bombing.
His age and service number would suggest that he was a Regular Soldier serving with the 1st Battalion and at the outbreak of War and stationed in Londonderry. However, his Medal Index Card shows he entered France on 11 September 1914 so he was probably one of the 21 men to join the Battalion at Le Mesnil on the 24th September.

He died on 8th November 1914, probably in the Hospital at Boulogne. He was probably one of the 78 NCOs and men from the 1st Battalion wounded between 15 - 22 October in action at Voilaines.

Link to CWGC details
Link to Cemetery name list
.... use this link to get a full list of all Soldiers buried in this Cemetery
Wimereux Communal Cemetery
Memorial inscription
Lt McCrae's grave
This cemetery also contains the body of Lt.-Col John McCrae, who wrote the poem "In Flanders Field".
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... about Lt.-Col. John McCrae and the poem.
Pt Connolly's gravestone
Pt Connolly's Medal Index Card
Pt Cronan's gravestone
Pt Cronan's Medal Index Card
Pt Jones' gravestone
Pt Jones' Medal Index Card